Announcing the 9th Annual Public Performance Measurement and Reporting Conference hosted by the School of Public Affairs and Administration at Rutgers University-Newark. The topic of this conference will be the usage of data collected by public and non-profits to make informed decisions based on the evidence available.

Public organizations are very good at collecting data, lots of data. However, the challenge in recent years has been to effectively sift through the mountains of information available and to begin making data driven decisions. By overcoming the data glut and designing relevant and impactful indicators, public organizations can move beyond managing through intuition to a state of performance management and deliver services to their stakeholders for less money and with higher quality.

This conference will bring together the greatest minds in the professional and academic world to discuss performance innovations, best practices, and emerging paradigms of public performance. Attendees will come away with the tools they need to start to fundamentally change their organization and begin collecting the right data in order to make the right decisions. 

We invite practitioner and research presentations on the application of performance measurement and improvement systems in public and non-profit organizations, especially:

  • Designing relevant performance indicators.
  • Creating a culture of data driven decision-making.
  • Effectively collecting, storing, and reporting your performance data.

We anticipate tracks in these five areas:

  • Municipal - and County - Level Performance Systems
  • State Performance Systems
  • Federal and International Performance Systems
  • Emerging Topics in Performance Management
  • Creating a Culture of Performance through Organizational Change

Additionally, we anticipate two main panel discussions:

  1. Emerging Topics in Performance Management.
  2. Too Much Data? Overcoming the Data Glut.

 

 
 
 
 
2015 Presentation Schedule
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